Link 20 Oct 1,659 notes Productivity was invented to support the myth that people are worthless and toil is sacred.»

alexandraerin:

Productivity is not the same thing as accomplishment. It doesn’t exist as a concept to justify anyone’s existence or continued employment or general worthiness. It exists to justify denying these things when it proves expedient to do so.

We are worth more than the wealth we…

(Source: boo-author)

Photo 20 Oct 30 notes mindblowingscience:

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Is Way Darker Than You Probably Realize

You’d never know from all the high-contrast photographs of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that the comet is actually quite dark. This recently released composite image reveals how little light there is emanating from 67P/C-G, relative to other objects in our solar system.
The composite image was included in a recent post about albedo (the term astronomers use to describe the reflectivity of an object) at ESA’s Rosetta Blog. It’s not none-more black, but 67P/C-G is pretty damn dark:

one way of giving at least a suggestion of just how dark comets are is to show 67P/C-G against a number of other Solar System objects exhibiting a wide range of albedos.
The montage below compares 67P/C-G with the Moon, the Earth, and Enceladus, a moon of Saturn. The brightness of each object in the montage has been scaled according to its mean albedo: for 67P/C-G, we have taken an albedo of 5%; for the Moon, 12%; for Earth, 31% (with deserts having an albedo of roughly 40%, thin clouds 30–50%, thick clouds 60–90%, and oceans 7–10%). Finally, for simplicity, an albedo of 100% has been taken for the brightest parts of the ice-covered surface of Enceladus, the most reflective body in the Solar System.
It’s hard to do this scientifically accurately, partly because the actual albedo in a given image of an object depends on a whole host of factors and because the human eye and brain don’t respond linearly to different light levels. But hopefully this comparison gives at least an impression of quite how dark 67P/C-G is and how diverse the Solar System’s bodies can be.

More here.

mindblowingscience:

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Is Way Darker Than You Probably Realize

You’d never know from all the high-contrast photographs of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that the comet is actually quite dark. This recently released composite image reveals how little light there is emanating from 67P/C-G, relative to other objects in our solar system.

The composite image was included in a recent post about albedo (the term astronomers use to describe the reflectivity of an object) at ESA’s Rosetta Blog. It’s not none-more black, but 67P/C-G is pretty damn dark:

one way of giving at least a suggestion of just how dark comets are is to show 67P/C-G against a number of other Solar System objects exhibiting a wide range of albedos.

The montage below compares 67P/C-G with the Moon, the Earth, and Enceladus, a moon of Saturn. The brightness of each object in the montage has been scaled according to its mean albedo: for 67P/C-G, we have taken an albedo of 5%; for the Moon, 12%; for Earth, 31% (with deserts having an albedo of roughly 40%, thin clouds 30–50%, thick clouds 60–90%, and oceans 7–10%). Finally, for simplicity, an albedo of 100% has been taken for the brightest parts of the ice-covered surface of Enceladus, the most reflective body in the Solar System.

It’s hard to do this scientifically accurately, partly because the actual albedo in a given image of an object depends on a whole host of factors and because the human eye and brain don’t respond linearly to different light levels. But hopefully this comparison gives at least an impression of quite how dark 67P/C-G is and how diverse the Solar System’s bodies can be.

More here.

via Shychemist.
Text 19 Oct 2,067 notes

glowcloud:

"This slur has been reclaimed" doesn’t mean everyone sees it that way, doesn’t mean it doesn’t still function as a slur, doesn’t mean it no longer carries the historical baggage of a slur and doesn’t mean it should be used by everyone without any regard for the feelings of those who it has been used against

via NOTORIOUS!.
Photo 19 Oct 44 notes 
Goethe Goethe’s symmetric colour wheel with associated symbolic qualitites 1809   Illustration Creative Commons - Wikipedia
more EXQUISITEness inside

Goethe 
Goethe’s symmetric colour wheel with associated symbolic qualitites 
1809 
  
Illustration 
Creative Commons - Wikipedia

more EXQUISITEness inside

(Source: mehtapty)

Photo 19 Oct 193,870 notes 

First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

this is the most important thing right now.

First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

this is the most important thing right now.

(Source: hadeiadel)

Video 19 Oct 410,392 notes

pandakingkong:

gothbone666:

Our entire world history nailed.

Things which remain consistant - Sex, death and war.

Exactly

this is the greatest thing I have seen on tumblr.

I had to have this

Fuckin Powerful

(Source: drrestless)

via .
Video 19 Oct 31,258 notes
Photo 19 Oct 56 notes israelwc:

Do NOT take care of your skin with #Palestinian Blood! http://t.co/cUv5ygI0iM

israelwc:

Do NOT take care of your skin with #Palestinian Blood! http://t.co/cUv5ygI0iM

via NOTORIOUS!.
Photo 19 Oct 16,062 notes saatchiart:

"I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.” –Jean-Michel Basquiat (Photo: New York Times Magazine, 1985)

saatchiart:

"I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.” –Jean-Michel Basquiat (Photo: New York Times Magazine, 1985)

Link 19 Oct 65 notes BREAKING: NY Court May Reinstate Hate Crime Conviction for Trans Woman's Killer»

thepoliticalfreakshow:

image

The original story from the Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund, and the breaking update below the original story.

On July 17, Dwight R. DeLee was convicted of manslaughter in the shooting death of 22-year-old Lateisha Green in Syracuse, New York.  On August 18, DeLee will be sentenced to a maximum of 25 years in prison for his role in the killing.  TLDEF staff members are currently en route to Syracuse.  We’ll once again be blogging and posting Twitter  and Facebook  updates about developments on the ground at the sentencing. 

The image you see in this message is from Essence magazine’s recent coverage of Lateisha’s story .  When we first began working with Lateisha’s family after her death last year, they asked us to help ensure that her death would not be in vain, and that people would learn something from their tragic loss.  We’re very proud - and Lateisha’s family is very proud - that Essence has chosen to feature Lateisha’s story.  Essence occupies a special place in the hearts of millions of Black women.  Since it was launched in 1970, Essence has become a cultural institution in the African-American community. By speaking out about Lateisha’s story, Lateisha’s family is connecting with audiences that might otherwise never have heard about her life or death as a transgender woman.  From the Associated Press to the Los Angeles Times , and now to Essence, Lateisha’s story is touching the hearts and minds of millions of people who probably knew very little about the continuing violence that affects the daily lives of transgender, lesbian, gay and bisexual people.  We’re grateful to Lateisha’s family for speaking out, and we’re grateful to our friends at GLAAD , whose expertise helped to keep this story alive for millions of people.

If you’re not familiar with Lateisha’s story, you can learn about it by reading the following articles and blog postings on our web site.  They’re chock full of information, photos and videos, and we think they’re well worth your time:

Show Your Support

Please continue to send personal notes of encouragement to Lateisha’s family during this difficult time. You can email correspondence by clicking here. We can’t guarantee the family will be able to reply to your emails, but we know that they’ll read them and that they appreciate everyone’s support. Please write!

Stay Informed

For final updates from the sentencing, stay tuned to all of the following sources:

    our website;

    TLDEF on Twitter ;

    the “Justice for Teish” Facebook page ; and

    GLAAD on Twitter .

As a final note, thank you for your support of the work we’ve been doing on this case.  Your notes of encouragement motivate us to pursue our work for equal rights.  We always welcome your input, and encourage you to continue to contact us.  Thank you.

Now, the breaking news update on Lateisha’s killer, Dwight DeLee, and a possible reinstatement of their hate crime conviction, courtesy of The Advocate.

On Wednesday, a crowd gathered outside the New York Court of Appeals in support of Lateisha Green, a 22-year-old trans woman murdered in Syracuse, N.Y. in 2008. The court is ruling this week on whether it will reinstate a hate crime conviction against her alleged killer, Dwight DeLee, reportsGLAAD.

DeLee, then 20, allegedly shot Green after uttering antigay slurs, and was found guilty of first-degree manslaughter as a hate crime in 2009. He was sentenced to 25 years in prison in what was New York’s first hate crime conviction in the killing of a transgender person, noted Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund executive director Michael Silverman.

However, the conviction was set aside by the New York State Fourth Appellate Division in July 2013 after the court declared the original verdict “inconsistent”: The jury had failed to find DeLee guilty of manslaughter first, and then guilty of a hate crime, and the presiding judge failed to make them aware of this.

After the verdict was thrown out, DeLee was set free. Shortly thereafter, the TLDEF, Lambda Legal, Empire State Pride Agenda, the NYU School of Law and several other organizations filed an amicus brief urging the New York Court of Appeals to reinstate DeLee’s conviction, according to GLAAD.

"I was devastated. I couldn’t believe it," Lateisha’s mother, Roxane Green, recalled of the decision in astatement. “I had lived through the agony of seeing my child die, having to choose the clothes to bury her in, waking up everyday to the horrible reality that she was gone. … Now I have to go back through that experience all over again.

"It’s so unfair to me, my family and community, and to every transgender woman who lives in fear of hateful violence happening to her, but especially to Lateisha. She was a beautiful, loving spirit who was expressing herself as who she was. And for that, she was targeted by a man who has been released."

Advocates pointed out that it seemed clear the jury sought to convict DeLee to the full extent of the law by virtue of declaring the murder a hate crime, making his release on a wording technicality all the more serious.

Watch the CNY Central report below for more.


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